Category: Cruising

Alaska Cruise Vacations

  • The incredible shore excursions and Alaska tours. When your ship is docked in ports such as Juneau, Skagway, and Ketchikan, you can participate in a wide array of shore excursions, everything from whale watching to bear viewing to riding in a sea plane through some of the most amazing fjords in the world.
  • The cooler weather. I don’t know about you, but when it’s 98 degrees at my house in the middle of August, the thought of head off to a place where it’s 65 degrees is incredibly appealing. The summer weather in Alaska is generally very comfortable, averaging around 60-65 at the coast and maybe 75 inland. It’s perfect weather for outdoor adventure.
  • The whales. I saw everything from Beluga whales to Orca to Humpbacks, and I didn’t even do on a whale watch. I saw most of them from the shore, and amazingly up close. Seeing these amazing animals in their natural environment is just incredible.
  • The rainforest. You may not know it, but southern Alaska is home to the largest rainforest in North America. It’s temperate rainforest (pines instead of palms), but it’s no less lush or dense than the rainforest you’ll find in the tropics, and no less beautiful. Thanks to the precipitation, waterfalls, streams, rivers, and lakes are literally everywhere. It’s all just so beautiful, it never stops taking your breath away.
  • The native cultures. You’ll have a chance to see everything from live totem pole carving to native dance ceremonies. There is a surprisingly large variety of different native cultures in the region (no, not just “Eskimos”), and these cultures have amazingly vibrant cultures, histories, and traditions.
  • The wildlife. Wildlife is unimaginably abundant. On my first cruise, I saw bears (black and brown), Dall sheep, a fox, deer, and a bunch of bald eagles — all in the wild. Kids will especially love seeing the wildlife. It’s a real treat.
  • The waterfalls. I know I mentioned waterfalls already, but they are so amazingly abundant in Alaska, I think they deserve a ranking of their own. There is an especially incredible number of waterfalls lining the steep walls of the fjords of Glacier Bay and Misty Fjords National Monument. Makes sure your cruise stops at one of these places, preferably Glacier Bay.
  • The opportunities for adventure. If you have an appetite for adventure, you’ll love the options available on an Alaskan cruise. Everything from dog sledding atop a glacier to ice climbing to dry-suit scuba diving. And that’s all just during your days in port. Add on a pre- or post-cruise inland adventure out of Anchorage, and you can go mountain climbing, white water rafting, mountain biking — you name it, it’s available.
  • The wilderness experience. There is something just so refreshing and uplifting about being surrounded by sheer wilderness. When you come back from an Alaska vacation, you are simply relaxed and renewed, and, the odds are, you won’t have a sun burn either.
  • The glaciers. Glaciers are the highlight of any Alaska cruise. There is simply nowhere else that you can see tidewater glaciers like these, up close and in action. Watching chunks of ice the size of five story buildings crash into the sea water is something you’ll never forget. It really does take your breath away.

Reasons Boat Damage

After you purchase a boat, before you take it out, it is necessary to thoroughly read your boat and engine’s operations manual. Ensure that you follow all the instructions given in the manual carefully. One should be aware of all the operation know-how’s before setting out on a sail. One wrong move and it might lead to a major damage of your boat machine. Also, to prevent accidents, prepare a pre-departure checklist and include in it all the points that you have to make sure of before you start out. Make sure that all supplies, charts, tools are aboard. Take all the necessary things which you would need in emergency situation like cell phone – etc.

Sometimes, the boat you purchase may have a manufacturing defect. In other words, it may be damaged when you buy it. In such a case, you may contact the manufacturers and work out a solution with them, either to have the boat replaced with another one or to get it repaired. Usually, a boat looks perfect upon observation, but may have minor problems which would lead to major billings later on. To prevent this, a Marine survey should be done when one purchases a boat. Different types or surveys are available like pre – purchase survey, insurance survey, damage inspection, appraisal inspection – etc

The major cause for the damage of the boat is poor maintenance. It includes caring for your boat properly when not in use and operating it correctly when in use. For instance, if you have not stored your boat carefully in a covered place, you may find that it has been damaged by some mischievous boys or some rodents may have made their home in your boat. It prevents the boat from environmental damage as well. Dirt on the bottom of the vessel should be cleaned regularly. Too little oil can cause the metal to overheat and damage the motor. Care of the operating parts of the boat, the engine and the various screws and valves is very essential. Any lack of proper care of these parts may cause damage to your boat necessitating expensive repairs.

Prevention is better than cure. But, as boat damage is inevitable, in spite of all the care taken, once the major causes of damage to a boat are known, it is possible to prevent the damage by addressing each of these causes in a proper manner.

Complete Vacation Experience

Most cruises are in a way all inclusive, because the price usually includes all the basic stuff like rooms, basic meals, etc. But all inclusive cruises take it a step further and their programs feature full trips and excursions at the cruise destinations, meals and fancy dinners, aboard-cruise activities, beverages and night entertainment. More expensive packages go as far as providing alcohol, shore excursion, scuba equipment and more.

You should keep in mind what type of vacation you are going to have in order to choose the right all inclusive cruises. There are packages to meet every need: family cruises, adult-only, golf cruises, honeymoon cruises, spring break cruises and many more. You definitely won’t run out of options.

When choosing all inclusive cruises for your vacation, be sure to check all the offers available according to your budget. There are a lot of options because there are a lot of cruise ships as well. Searching in internet can result in a whole set of varied offers that you can then search more deeply. You may also like to contact a travel consultant who will be of immense help to find the perfect all inclusive cruises for your vacation.

In the end, remember that all inclusive cruises are the perfect way to have a no worries cruise vacation. Just take your time choosing the right package for you and you are guaranteed to have the time of your life.

Alaska Glacier Cruises

What if I told you that you could do something truly unique and adventurous, something that the whole family would love? What if I told you that there was a family cruise destination so breathtakingly beautiful and teeming with wildlife that you could spend days captivated at the rail of a cruise ship and still not get enough? Would you be interested? Sure you would.

Few people have visited Alaska without having been changed by the experience. Much of the terrain consists of gorgeous, formidable glaciers and ice fields which cover over 5% of Alaska’s land surface.

This natural beauty can be seen from many top tourist destinations of Alaska including Juneau, Valdez, Seward and the Matanuska Valley, but is usually only fully appreciated with an up close and personal view that only a cruise through the inland waterways can afford. From this vantage point you will stand spellbound by tidewater glaciers that reach over 100 ft. in height and the antics of wildlife such as humpback whales, orcas, sea lions, dolphins, brown bears and bald eagles.

In Alaska, there is a multitude of attractions that will keep you coming back for more. Cruise the smooth inland waterways of Alaska and come surprising close to the sheer ice faces of these magnificent, natural phenomenons; port at luxuriant destinations complete with fine dining and unique entertainment; and make memories that will last a lifetime.

The truth is: The popularity of Alaska glacier cruises is growing in leaps and bounds due to the awe-inspiring beauty of Alaska’s glaciers and the affordability and wide range of cruise packages available. You can choose from one-day inland cruise packages which are as priced as low as $50 per person to a luxurious six night cruise on a deluxe designer yacht for as little as $4,000 per person. Of course there is a wide range of cruise options that fall between these two extremes. Take for instance the seven day voyage available through a well-known cruise provider. For under $2,000 per person, this trip affords passengers the opportunity to cruise several top Alaskan inside passages aboard a luxuriant cruise liner and port at several top destinations.

Choosing the Right Cabin in Cruising

  • PRICE. Rooms on the top decks are pricy. Do you want this luxury or would you rather spend your money on other things? We wanted a comfortable cabin with enough space to move about and dry our laundry. When our travel agent called and said he could upgrade us to a more expensive cabin with a veranda we turned down the deal.
  • POSITION. Your travel agent will supply you with a plan of the ship. Study the plan carefully before you reserve a cabin. Our cabin was in the middle of the ship and on the same floor as the lifeboats, which made the lifeboat drill easy. The door to the promenade deck was just a few feet down the hall and we walked as often as we could.
  • CONVENIENCE. It’s convenient to have a cabin close to elevators and stairs. One of the things we liked best about our cabin was that it was close to the laundry. Our ship would do our laundry for $32 but we could do it ourselves for a $2.00 washing machine fee and $1.00 dryer fee. We would put a load in the washing machine, go back to our cabin and watch television for a while, and then dry our clothes. Passengers who were not close to the laundry had to wash their clothes at odd hours. Do not reserve a room across from the laundry because you will probably be disturbed.
  • VIEW. Some of the rooms on large ships have no windows at all. Do you want a cabin with a view? You may choose a lower deck cabin with a porthole or an upper deck cabin with a rectangular window. We chose a cabin with a window because we wanted natural light, wanted to see other ships, and wanted to see geographical changes. There were times, however, when we had to close our drapes because so many people were walking by.
  • TRAVEL COMPANIONS. If you are traveling with friends you probably want a cabin on the same deck and/or hallway. Your travel agent will be glad to arrange this for you. Our friends were just a few doors away and we often met them for lunch and activities. Being near each other helped us to coordinate our shore plans.

Learning to Sail

These governing bodies have designed a series of courses that enable people to obtain internationally recognised qualifications. The courses are rarely run by the national body itself. Private companies can apply to run the courses to national associations/federations and if approved they can then offer recognised courses to people wanting to learn to sail.

Courses are available both on the water (practical) and shore based (theory) for sailboats, power and motor boats, dinghies as well as supplementary courses such as sea survival and diesel engine maintenance. This article will look only at courses for sailing boats and the structure of courses within the United Kingdom.

The the number of people carried on board for the practical courses will vary but normally will not exceed an instructor and 5 students. I completed my own Day Skipper Practical with just one fellow student and the instructor. The higher the student/instructor ratio, the less one to one time everybody gets with the instructor but the cost per person is reduced. It is also preferable, I think, to have a mix of people taking different courses. 5 people taking the Coastal Skipper Practical Course aboard the same boat will have a reduced amount of time in their role as skipper.

Getting started – The first course we’ll look at is called Start Yachting, no previous experience is required and over two days participants will be shown how to steer a yacht, how to handle the sails, a little ropework and an insight into safety on board. The Competant Crew course is again aimed at complete beginners, no previous experience is required. This course last five days and in addition to steering and sail handling participants will be shown how to keep a lookout and row a dinghy.

The first shorebased course is called Day Skipper Theory. A little on the water experience is desirable. The course requires 40 hours and two written exams are taken at the conclusion. Primarily about the basics of navigation, seamanship and the weather, when completed you should be able to navigate a boat in familiar waters in daylight.

The Day Skipper Practical follows and can be completed in 5 days or over 3 weekends. This can be undertaken in either tidal or non-tidal waters and the certificate issued at completion recognizes the distinction. Experience is required, participants should have spent five days at sea with 4 hours night sailing and have logged 100 miles. The course covers boat handling, seamanship and navigation and pilotage. When finished you should be able to skipper a yacht in familiar waters in daylight.

The Watchleader Practical course, as the name suggests, teaches the responsibilitiesof a watchleader, navigation seamanship, safety and collision avoidance. Experience is required, participants should have have logged 100 miles and spent five days at sea with 4 hours night sailing. After the 5 day course you should be able to take the watch on a sail traing vessel.

The second shorebased course is called Coastal Skipper/Yachtmaster Offshore Theory. This course is in part a preparation for the Coastal Skipper and Yachtmaster Offshore practical examinations. It continues on from the Day Skipper theory course looking again at navigation and meteorology and also considers safety, collision avoidance and passage planning. Some practical experience is necessary and you should understand theory of navigation to the level of the pervious Day Skipper theory course. The course takes 40 hours and concludes with three examination papers. When completed you should understand the theory of navigation required to undertake coastal and offshore passages.

The Coastal Skipper Practical Course follows the theory. Again this can be taken in tidal or non-tidal waters and again the certificate issued at completion recognizes the distinction. This course is aimed at skippers wishing to make coastal passages by both day and night. It assumes you will have spent 15 days at sea with 2 of them as skipper and have 8 night hours. You should have logged 300 miles. You should have practical skills equivalent to the Day Skipper Theory Course and theoretical navigation to Coastal Skipper/Yachtmaster Offshore Theory. The course lasts 5 days and deals with boat handling, safety and emergency situations, pilotage by day and night and passage planning. You will be expected to plan and skipper a short passage.Upon completion you should be able to skipper a yacht on coastal passages by day and night.

You can follow this up with the Coastal Skipper Sailing Practical Examination. More experience is required, 30 days at sea with 2 days as skipper and 12 night hours and you should have logged 800 miles. You are also required to hold a First Aid Certificate and a VHF SRC Radio Operator’s Certificate. You should undertand theory to the level of the Coastal Skipper/Yachtmaster shorebased course. Course content includes boat handling and seamanship, collision avoidance, safety, passage making and navigation, meteorology and ability as skipper. Upon completion you should be capable of skippering a yacht on coastal passages by day and night and with the additional of a commercial endorsement you can skipper commercial vessels under 24 metres in length up to 20 miles from a safe haven. For one person you should expect the exam to take between 6 – 10 hours, if two people are taking the exam this will increase to between 8 -14 hours.

The next level is the Yachtmaster Offshore Sailing Practical Examination. Canditates are required to have spent 50 days at sea with 5 days as skipper you should have logged 2,500 miles. You should have made 5 passages in excess of 60 miles including 2 overnight and 2 as skipper. Again you are required to hold a First Aid Certificate and a VHF SRC Radio Operator’s Certificate. You should undertand theory to the level of the Coastal Skipper/Yachtmaster shorebased course. You will be expected to demonstrate your ability as the skipper of an offshore sailing yacht, including questions on collision avoidance, navigation, pilotage, meteorology and boat handling. After a sucsessful completion you should be able to skipper an offshore sailing yacht by day or night. For one person you should expect the exam to take between 8 – 12 hours, if two people are taking the exam this will increase to between 10 -18 hours.

Back on shore for the Yachtmaster Ocean Theory Course. This provides the knowledge required for those wishing to sail long distances. It covers ocean passage making and astro navigation including the use of a sextant. I’m sure the purists will disagree but personally I’m not convinced of the relevance of astro navigation and the sextant. I once crewed across the Atlantic for a couple who were making a circumnavigation. Seeing the sextant on board I asked the skipper if he could give me a demonstration of it’s use. He pointed me in the direction of the book that went with it saying he’d relied upon GPS for the last 12 years. “What happens if the GPS packs up?” I asked. “We use the spare one” he told me. The course lasts 40 hours and when completed you should understand how to plan and navigate on an ocean passage.

Finally the Yachtmaster Ocean Sailing Oral Examination on passage details and sun sight information. You must have successfully completed the Yachtmaster Offshore practical exam. You should have made a 600 mile passage as either mate or skipper and be able to take sun-run-sun sights and compass check by azumuth. You will receive questions on the techniques and problems of ocean passage making, including navigation, passage planning and ocean meteorology.The exam lasts a minimum of 1 and 1/2 hours and upon sucsessful completion you should be able to skipper a sailing yacht on an ocean passage.

Sinking Feeling

It is said that the happiest days of a boat owner’s life are the day she buys a boat, and the day she sells it. Truer words were never spoken. It has also been said that owning a boat is like standing in a cold shower tearing up $20 bills. This is not true. You’re tearing up $100 bills, at least.

All my friends were shopping madly, all over town, buying clothes, shoes, furniture. I was at Home Depot melting my Visa card on stuff like stainless steel piano hinge. Wood plugs. Router bits. I do have every power tool known to God and Bob Vila, so Tim Allen, kiss my…keel. I was committed to this relationship. Committed? I was certifiable – I lived on my boat. And what a harsh house-mother she was, too.

As you read this, raise your arms so your hands are close together, right over your head. Keep them there for four hours. Every spring, I was forced to do this for days at a time. Holding a ten pound grinder. Carpal tunnel? I had the entire carpal subway system.

Every task I undertook involved a toxic chemical. My life became an EPA Superfund site. Most of the containers had a warning label that said – “A brain tumor in every can” – now that’s what I call a warning label!

The first summer I had the boat I was determined to practice safe boating – I wore a TyVek suit when I was painting her. Have you ever worn a TyVek suit? When it was 100 degrees? It’s like being locked in a sauna for hours at a time. I did lose 10 pounds that summer, though – in addition to about a billion brain cells from the paint fumes.

The entire relationship was co-dependent. The boat wanted to dissolve like an aspirin, and I had to prevent it from dissolving like an aspirin. Bit by bit, the boat was winning. The teak decks leaked no matter how many times I re-caulked them. The engine developed multiple personality disorder. The lines would fray even if they were coiled up in the rope locker. The fenders deflated. Then she tried to throw me overboard – the lifeline stanchions on the starboard side all broke at the same time.

This was a fight to the finish.

It was that old relationship conundrum – divorce? Never! Murder? Quite possibly. The boat did have reason to wish me harm – I HAD grounded her within fifteen minutes of our first voyage together. And there were the groundings in the Piankatank River, Boston Harbor, Rockaway Bay, and Sandy Hook.

She harbored a grudge.

And after everything I did for her, too.

I gave her a complete makeover from top to bottom – I rewired and painted her mast, I replaced her batteries and rewired the cabin, I completely redid her hull with the BEST isophthalic polyester-resin (say that three times fast) – I gave her all of my spare time and more than all of my spare cash. I even bought her jewelry – new rudder fittings made of silicon bronze that cost over $2,000. I’ve never spent that much on jewelry for myself!

We had wonderful adventures together – trips to Martha’s Vineyard, Nantucket and Cape Cod. We sailed up the Hudson River and down the coast to Cape May.

But it was never enough. She always needed, demanded more.

The end finally came one day in November of 2000 – I’d given all I could give. I’d reached the end of my rope, and my checkbook.

I’d reached the second happiest day of my life – I sold her to a family that fell in love with her at first sight.

The poor slobs.

As I watched her sail away, I felt a twinge of sadness. Then I thought of my checkbook, which now had a positive balance. A VERY positive balance!

I’ve heard that my former significant other is still up to her old tricks – it took her new owners almost a month to get her from Long Island Sound to Gaylesville, Maryland. The engine’s multiple personality disorder kicked in, and the mainsail did its “look at me! I’m shredding!” trick – but her new owners are determined to keep her happy. I hope they have a fat checkbook – she’s a hungry old girl.

So I’m single again – but I’m a hopeless romantic. I’m eyeing charter boats in the Caribbean.

Marina of Sotogrande in Spain

On Sundays and Wednesdays there is a market which sells both local crafts and antiques. The marina was originally built in 1987 and has a total of 739 berths, of which 33 are 25-30 metres, and 8 are over 30 metres. These are often fully booked, particularly when one of the major sporting events is taking place such as the Volvo masters. Construction is well under way to increase this number to over 1000. There are a variety of restaurants, bars and shops to suit all tastes but many clients feel that the marina lacks atmosphere and can be rather soulless, particularly out of season. There are much prettier and more intimate marinas further up the coast such as Duquesa and Cabopina.

Mooring is available both alongside and stern to. The maximum length of yacht that can be accommodated is 70 metres and the maximum draught is 4.5 metres, with a maximum beam of 14 metres. Prices vary between 90 euros in high season to 50 euros in low season based on a 24m plus yacht for a 24 hour period. The nearest International airport is Gibraltar approx. 25km away, and the nearest heliport is 20km. Facilities available at the quayside include electricity, fresh water, fuel ( both petrol and diesel ) sewage removal, and direct line telephone. Parking is available but is extremely difficult in high season. Cable TV is also available. Workshops are available for both major and minor repairs.

Puerto SotograndeTorre de ControlSotogrande11310CadizSpain Tel: 0034 956 790000Fax: 0034 956 790109

Bargain Cruises Guide

You may consult a travel agent who has specialization in cruising. There are so many travel agents that are specializing in Caribbean, Alaska or Rhine etc. You’ve to just meet an experienced travel agent who has specialization in the area where you want to spend your vacations. Sometimes the agent has not any experience about that place so you should choose travel agent carefully.

Today Internet offers great information about bargain cruises. At present every cruise line has its own web site and they offers complete information about their cruise. You can book your seats in advance by getting information via Internet. You can also get discounts by reserving your seats in advance. Cruise lines updates their sites regularly to give latest information about cruise. You can also have a look of floor plan of ship and its cabins from their website that will help you in making right decision. You should search for unsold empty cabins for getting heavy discounts.

Generally last minute cruise bargains offers heavy discount because the cruise lines are trying to fill empty cabins at the departure time. So it is the best option to choose the cruise that is going to leave within next two weeks. Those people who can manage all the arrangements on a short notice can enjoy bargain cruises completely. The people who can’t travel on such short notice it is not good for them. Sometimes cruise lines offer discounts of 50% or more for the last minute reservations.

Repositioning cruise is also great option for bargain cruises. It will offer more time to enjoy ship’s facilities. You can also visit some odd ports where the cruise traffic is less. These cruises are also known as ‘repo cruises’. If you’re planning before several months it is the best for you. You should always keep in mind that the overall cost of repo cruises is more than ordinary cruises. They don’t require advertisements because they’ve standing reservation for every season. Cost of repo cruises is large because it offers amenities for three or more weeks.

Truly Relaxing Vacation on an Island Cruise

On an island cruise you will be able to relax in style. You will sail off in a luxurious ocean liner where the ship’s crew will attend to your every need. Imagine being on that ship, perhaps lying on a deck chair beside the swimming pool, getting a tan under the warm sun with a paperback in your hands and a drink at your side. And you won’t have work and family around to distract you from just relaxing and having a good read.

On the ship, you can feast on the excellent buffet and enjoy all kinds of entertainment on board. You could visit the shipboard casino and roll the dice or sit in a card game or two. You may not only have fun but even come away a big winner. At night, there are usually dinner shows performed by skilled singers, musicians, and comedians. You may even get to see a magician perform. And if that’s not for you, you can stroll around the ship, enjoying the ocean breeze and the beautiful view. It is an especially good way to take in a lovely sunset, or the sight of a full moon above the water.

And of course, the ship will take you to faraway places that you had only ever seen in books. Be it in Tahiti or Tawi-Tawi, you will get to experience island life first-hand, and have the chance to soak up the sun on lovely white sand beaches, or enjoy the adventure of snorkeling and skin diving in beautiful reefs and sea sanctuaries. You may even get to see whales or dolphins, and see many more of mother nature’s wonders.

In time, you will even forget about the stress of your life back home and sink into the relaxation of cruise living. You will be fully refreshed when you return and see your kids again. Not only will it be great to see the people you missed on your trip, but you will have something new you can share with them. Sometimes you really do need to get away from things and going an island cruise is a great way to do just that.

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